Survival Guide Ch. 11-12

April 18, 2010 at 3:32 pm (PRCA 3030, Reading Notes)

Chapter 11: More Social Tools

  • Posting your events in social calendars is a great way to get extra exposure. They offer a convenient way for you to post your events in one place & highlight them in may ways on many different platforms. Upcoming is a good example.
  • Social pages are sites where, instead of creating a page about yourself, your book, or your business, you create pages about a particular topic. Visitors can search for pages on particular topics or ones authored by specific people. Squidoo is a good example.
  • Squidoo is about finding people when you care what they know instead of who they know.
  • Wikis (wiki is Hawaiian for fast) is a collaborative Website that allows anyone to update its content. Once established, a Wiki essentially becomes an ever-changing online database of information.
  • Social search portals offer your visitors a unique search experience right from your Website or blog. You can quickly build a search engine focused on any topic, and over time, this search portal will generate increasingly relevant search results as users vote results up & down for every search query.
  • Virtual worlds are virtual 3-D worlds created by participants. You are able to build a virtual book club or opening a virtual presentation area for your business.

Chapter 12: Pulling it all Together

  • Remember that social media & Web 2.0 optimization mean optimizing for interactivity, sharing, & collaboration. Determine if your existing Website is optimized by asking yourself a few questions about it:

1. Can users interact with the content?

2. Can visitors share the content easily with others?

3. Does the site encourage collaboration?

  • With a bit of planning you can streamline the process to keep all of your Social Web accounts fresh & engaging without breaking your back or breaking the bank. The trick is to make your social accounts work together.

Note: The reading notes above came from the textbook A Survival Guide to Social Media and Web. 2.0 Optimization: Strategies, tactics, and tooks for succeeding in the social web. This is a book written by Deltina Hay.

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Survival Guide Ch. 10

April 18, 2010 at 3:16 pm (PRCA 3030, Reading Notes)

Chapter 10: Social Media Newsrooms

  • A social media newsroom (SMNR) is similar to a traditional online newsroom, it lists media coverage, news releases, events, media contact information, but also includes social media and Web 2.0 elements that allow visitors to share and interact with its content.
  • A SMNR is for individuals or businesses that tend to get or want to get a lot of media coverage, or who put out news releases on a regular basis.
  • A newsroom tells members of the media & prospective clients that you are making a serious effort to make their jobs easier.
  • A social media newsroom should not replace your existing Website. You still want a place for blogging and to have a more traditional place to present other information. You will also do all of your “selling” on your website. Your SMNR is NOT A SALES TOOL.
  • Your newsroom is meant to be a neutral place to present all of your media materials, just like a mega-news release.
  • A SMNR means that each entry in your newsroom, from a news release to a simple image, can be automatically indexed in search engines, RSS feed indexes, and social bookmarking services, since each entry is added as a separate entry that can be given its own key terms.
  • Your SMNR is NOT a sales tool.
  • It is best to build your newsroom using a blogging or CMS platform such as WordPress.
  • A social media news release is essentially a traditional news release that is social media & Web 2.0 optimized. In short, the release encourages interactivity, is easily shared in the Social Web, and contains other Web 2.0 elements.
  • You can use PRWeb to create your own social media releases.

Note: The reading notes above came from the textbook A Survival Guide to Social Media and Web. 2.0 Optimization: Strategies, tactics, and tooks for succeeding in the social web. This is a book written by Deltina Hay.

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Survival Guide Ch. 8-9

April 8, 2010 at 3:01 pm (PRCA 3030, Reading Notes)

Chapter 8: Media Communities

  • Media communities are social sites where you can save, share, and comment on multimedia items.
  • Image sharing sites are a way for you to get some serious mileage out of your photos and other images.
  • Flickr is probably the most popular site on the internet for sharing images. Flickr offers a place for you to share your images with others, as well as a platform for organizing and linking to your images.
  • There are three steps to the process of uploading & optimizing images:

1. Choosing your images

2. Uploading your images

3. Giving your uploaded images good titles, descriptions, & tags.

  • Many claim that video is the future of the Internet.
  • You can search images in Flickr and videos in YouTube using search terms just as you do in a search engine like Google. You search results return images or videos that have your search terms in their title or description.
  • Don’t forget that the purpose of media sharing communities is for people to connect with each other through a shared medium like images and video.

Chapter 9: Widgets & Badges

  • Widgets are snippets of code, usually displayed graphically, that can be used to syndicate content, for example RSS feeds, or to add interactive features that users can drop onto their own blogs or Websites.
  • Widgets are often customizable by the user & typically offer ways for users to pull information from the widget’s originating site.
  • Widgets come in different styles and levels of complexity. Some are simple links back to their source, others are as complex as mini-search engines you can implement on your own site.
  • Some widgets help you show off all the places you are in the Social Web.
  • Only add widgets to your site that you believe will benefit your visitors or are essential to your presence; don’t place them just for the sake of placing them

Note: The reading notes above came from the textbook A Survival Guide to Social Media and Web. 2.0 Optimization: Strategies, tactics, and tooks for succeeding in the social web. This is a book written by Deltina Hay.

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Survival Guide Ch. 7

April 8, 2010 at 2:43 pm (PRCA 3030, Reading Notes)

Chapter 7: Social Bookmarking & Crowd-Sourcing

  • Social bookmarking is a way for you to save your favorite blogs and Websites in a public space the same way you might save them using your own Web browser.
  • Imagine that you have saved (or bookmarked) all of your favorite Websites and blogs to a central place online & tagged them with specific terms so you could easily search them & find them later.
  • Instead of search engines providing you with the “supposed” best matches for your search terms, you can go to a social bookmarking site, search using those same terms, and find the top sites tagged (and commented on) by users just like you.
  • Delicious.com is one of the most popular social bookmarking sites.
  • Many of the social bookmarking sites have developed social networking characteristics as well.
  • Other popular social bookmarking sites are: Technorati, StumpleUpon, & Searchles.
  • A crowd-sourced news site allows its users to determine the popularity of a news story, blog entry, or Website through various types of voting or rating systems. Many of these sites also have some certain social aspects, allowing users to connect to others with similar interests.
  • This system gives news-searchers an alternative to what is served up to them by the regular news sites.
  • Once you have an account with a crowd-sourced news site, you can add your content and/or rate existing content.
  • Digg.com is an example of a crowd-sourcing site.
  • Some of the other popular crowd sourcing sites are: reddit, Mixx, & Gabbr.
  • Crowd-sourced news sites are different from social bookmarking sites in that they focus on sharing news and information about stories, Websites, and blogs, as opposed to sharing bookmarks to Websites or blogs.

Note: The reading notes above came from the textbook A Survival Guide to Social Media and Web. 2.0 Optimization: Strategies, tactics, and tooks for succeeding in the social web. This is a book written by Deltina Hay.

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Survival Guide Ch. 6

March 30, 2010 at 2:10 pm (PRCA 3030, Reading Notes)

Chapter 6: Social Networking & Micro-Blogging

  • Social networking is one of the most powerful social media strategies you can implement.
  • Most social networking sites allow you to create a personal profile page to post information about you or your business, invite people to join your network, join groups, blast messages and events, and connect with other people.
  • Facebook is currently the fastest growing social networking site and an ideal first choice for anyone or any business wanting to get a solid foothold in the Social Web.

  • There are many social and professional networking sites out there. The best thing to do however is to find the ones that are the best fit for you or your business and your needs.
  • MySpace is like a combination of a Facebook page and a Facebook profile.

  • LinkedIn is more of a professional networking site than a social one. This site is a great tool for people wanting to connect with other professionals, or for those seeking professional positions. It is also ideal for consultants and service firms seeking clients.

  • Twitter is considered a micro-blogging platform. It is a bit of a hybrid between blogging and social networking. This basic concept of combining blogging and social networking. This basic concept of combining blogging and interactivity has become so popular that, as we saw in both Facebook and LinkedIn, many of the other networks now have this same feature builty in.  The basic premise is for people to stay in touch through quick, frequent answer to one simple question: “What are you doing?”

  • A good social networking strategy includes establishing a healthy presence in one or more of hte above staple networkings sites, coupled with a presence in a couple of niche sites that put you in front of potential clients and affiliates in your area of expertise.
  • If you have a large readership or following who tend to have a lot to say to each other, you might consider creating your own social network. There are a number of ways to create a social network using CMSs such as Joomla, Drupal, or Ning.com.

Note: The reading notes above came from the textbook A Survival Guide to Social Media and Web. 2.0 Optimization: Strategies, tactics, and tooks for succeeding in the social web. This is a book written by Deltina Hay.

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Survival Guide Ch. 5

March 25, 2010 at 1:50 pm (PRCA 3030, Reading Notes)

Chapter 5: Podcasting, Vidcasting, & Webcasting

  • A podcast is a series of audio or video files that is distributed over the Internet.
  • A podcast can be syndicated or subscribed to.
  • A podcast is an RSS fee.
  • A podcast includes both audio and video files.
  • Before you create your first episode, you should be clear about the purpose of the podcast. People expect consistency as to the topics your episodes will cover.
  • Publishing options for your podcast:

1. Use a blogging platform

2. Publish to your website

3. Use a service such as HipCast or Audio Acrobat

  • Audacity is a good freeware choice for recording audio for your podcast. You need to get a decent microphone for your computer first or the quality of your podcasts will suffer.
  • After your podcast is recorded you will  need to save the file as an MP3. In order to do this, you will need to go to File…Export as MP3  in Audacity.
  • After recording your podcast, the  next step will be to upload your MP3 file to your hosting site. Using FTP is the preferred method for getting your files onto your site.
  • As you create your podcast and episodes, keep the following three optimization points in mind:

1. Many audio & video search engines now use speech recognition to identify key terms within podcasts. So make sure you write each episode to include your best key terms, and that you use these same key terms in the file’s metadata and on teh landing page of each podcast episode.

2. You add the metadata for each podcast episode when you save it as an MP3 file. Repeat key terms from the actual spoken episode in this metadata.

3. The page where each podcast episode resides is called its landing page. Again, make sure you repeat your best key terms on this page, and especially repeat terms that are spoken in the podcast episode.

  • Once your podcast is published, you will want to burn it to FeedBurner and optimize it.
  • A webcast is an online broadcast, and usually consists of a series of uploaded videos. They can be viewed either on Webcasting sites or embedded into your Website or blog.
  • Webcasts are also called channels. YouTube lets you create channels that you can regularly add videos to.

Note: The reading notes above came from the textbook A Survival Guide to Social Media and Web. 2.0 Optimization: Strategies, tactics, and tooks for succeeding in the social web. This is a book written by Deltina Hay.

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Survival Guide Ch. 2-3

March 25, 2010 at 1:30 pm (PRCA 3030, Reading Notes)

Chapter 2: Preparation

  • Keywords are the terms that help search engine robots properly categorize your Website in the search engines.
  • In social application, “tags” are the equivalent to keywords or key terms.
  • Before you begin creating your profile you need to make two decisions:

1. What “entity” will you be representing in the Social Web?

2. Which person within your organization will be representing you in the Social Web?

  • After answering each of the two above questions, decide on a couple of your best tags and be sure to use that tag in every description and biography from that point forward.

Chapter 3: RSS Feeds & Blogs

  • RSS=Really Simple Syndication
  • RSS feed is a way of syndicating (sharing) information across the Internet.
  • A feed can be compared to that of a subscription, like getting your local paper delivered to your doorstop, every story within the paper is delivered to your desktop.
  • Before you are able to subscribe to an RSS feed, you will need to access a feed reader or a “aggregator.” A popular feed reader is Google Fee Reader.
  • RSS fee is an XML file that is formatted so any feed reader can decipher and organize the contents of the file. The result is a file containing many stories (called items) that is kept up to date by the feed’s author.
  • A blog is an RSS feed.
  • You do NOT need a reader to access RSS feeds, only to subscribe to them.
  • There are options for creating an RSS feed

1. Create your RSS feed from an XML file

2. Use software to create your RSS feed

3. Use your blog as your RSS feed

  • A blog is a tool for posting information chronologically and allowing others to comment. Posts can be organized into categories and indexed using tags that are read by blog indexes (much the same way as key terms are read by search engines.)


Note: The reading notes above came from the textbook A Survival Guide to Social Media and Web. 2.0 Optimization: Strategies, tactics, and tooks for succeeding in the social web. This is a book written by Deltina Hay.

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Groundswell: Chapters 10-12

February 16, 2010 at 11:27 am (PRCA 3030, Reading Notes)

Chapter 10

Incorporating the three elements of groundswell thinking into your organization.

  1. Take small steps that have big impact.
  2. Have a vision and a plan.
  3. Build leaders into the plan.

What to do to make sure you and your company have the best chance at succeeding:

  • First, start small.
  • Second, educate your executives.
  • Third, get the right people to run your strategy.
  • Fourth, get your agency and technology partners in sync.

Chapter 11

Best Buy calls their sales associates “blue shirts,” because that is what they wear to work, blue polo shirts. Although that may be the obvious reason, it is certainly not the only reason. Blue Shirt Nation is an internal community for Best Buy’s employees. On the website, employees can share their thoughts, opinions, and ideas on how to change or better the company. This website makes the employees feel as if they are not getting lost in a “sea of blue shirts.”

Here is how Best Buy and Blue Shirt Nation achieved the five goals of the groundswell.

  1. Listening. Steve and Gary set up BSN to listen, but with employees, this can turn into problem solving. Management listened to BSN and as a result restored the employee discount that had been taken away.
  2. Talking. Corporate can post policy changes where everyone can read them.
  3. Energizing. BSN gives employees a platform and amplifies voices across the entire Best Buy employee base.
  4. Supporting. BSN gives employees and managers the opportunity to keep in touch and interact directly with each other. It is a “natural” extension of the mentoring culture.
  5. Embracing. BSN is a way to surface both ideas and talent.

Chapter 12

Lessons learned from groundswell thinkers:

  1. Never forget the groundswell is about person-to-person activity.
  2. Be a good listener.
  3. Be patient.
  4. Be opportunistic.
  5. Be flexible.
  6. Be collaborative.
  7. Be humble.

Note: Please refer to my previous post for information about the source of these notes.

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Groundswell: Chapters 7-9

February 8, 2010 at 11:10 am (PRCA 3030, Reading Notes)

Chapter 7

What is energizing?

-using the word of mouth to get information out about a brand or product, without any cost to the company.

Word of mouth succeeds because:

  • It’s believable.
  • It’s self-reinforcing.
  • It’s self-spreading.

Techniques for connecting with your  brand’s enthusiasts:

  1. Tap into customers’ enthusiasim with ratings and reviews.
  2. Create a community to energize your customers.
  3. Participate in and energize online communities of your brand enthusiasts.

How to apply techniques of ernergizing to your own organization.

  1. Figure out if you want to energize the groundswell.
  2. Check the social technographics profile of your customers.
  3. Ask yourself, “what is my customer’s problem?”
  4. Pick a strategy that fits your customers’ social technographics profile and problems.
  5. Don’t start unless you can stick around for the long haul.

Chapter 8

Suggestions for building a community for support:

  • Start small, but plan for a larger presence.
  • Reach out to your most active customers.
  • Plan to drive traffic to your community.
  • Build in a reputation system.
  • Let your customers lead you.

Is a wiki for you?

  • You need people.
  • You need content.
  • You need patience and loyalty.

Chapter 9

You can move faster by embracing…why?

  1. Customers don’t take long to tell you what they want.
  2. When customers are in the loop, innovation happens more quickly.

The companies that win by embracing their customers incorporate those suggestions into their own development and process strengths.

Once you introduce the groundswell into your company…THINGS CHANGE.

Note: Please refer to my previous post for information about the source of these notes.

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Groundswell: Chapters 4-6

January 31, 2010 at 10:48 am (PRCA 3030, Reading Notes)

Chapter 4

There is a four-step planning process for building your groundswell strategy. The acronym is POST.

  1. People. Asses how your customers will engage, based on what they are already doing.
  2. Objectives. What are your goals?
  3. Strategy. You can plan for the desired changes up front, as ell as measuring them once strategy is under way.
  4. Technology. What applications should you build?

Five objectives that companies can pursue:

  1. Listening
  2. Talking
  3. Energizing
  4. Supporting
  5. Embracing

Chapter 5

There are two ways to listen to the groundswell:

  1. Set up your own private community. A private community is like a c ontinuously running, huge, engaged focus group. This is a natural interaction in a setting where you can listen in.
  2. Begin brand monitoring. Hire a company to listen to the Internet (blogs, discussion forums, YouTube, and everything else). Have the company put all the information into summary reports  and then push out the information to certain departments (i.e. customer service).

Why you should listen to the groundswell:

  1. Find out what your brand stands for.
  2. Understand how buzz is shifting.
  3. Save research money; increase research responsiveness.
  4. Find the sources of influence in your market.
  5. Manage PR crisis.
  6. Generate new product and marketing ideas.

Tips on how to succeed with groundswell listening:

  • Check the social technographics profile of your customers.
  • Start small, think big.
  • Make sure your listening vendor has dedicated an experienced team to your effort.
  • Choose a senior program to interpret the information and integrate it with other sources.

Chapter 6

Techniques for talking with the groundswell:

  1. Post a viral video.
  2. Engage in social networks and user-generated content sites.
  3. Join the blogosphere.
  4. Create a community.

Tips for successful blogging:

  • Start by listening.
  • Determine a goal for the blog.
  • Estimate the ROI (return on investment).
  • Develop a plan.
  • Rehearse.
  • Develop an editorial process.
  • Design the blog and its connection to your site.
  • Develop a marketing plan so people can find the blog.
  • Remember, blogging is more than writing.
  • Final advice: be honest.

Note: Please refer to my previous post for information about the source of these notes.

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